Call TODAY
FOR A
FREE ESTIMATE

Praying Mantis: All You Need To Know

Looking to learn all about praying mantis types? You’re in the right place! Here, we’ll provide an overview of the different praying mantis species, as well as some key information on their ecology and behavior.

Keeping pests away from your home, there are various ways. Try different DIY tricks by yourself or hire a pesticide control group like Ortex pest control to ensure the safety of your children and things.

What Are Mantis

Mantis religiosa (a scientific name for mantis) is a highly recognizable family of predatory insects. Their distinctive appearance, upright posture, raptorial forelegs, and highly articulated neck have made them culturally familiar worldwide.

Mantis are found in temperate and tropical areas all over the world. There are approximately 2,400 mantid species worldwide, with new species being discovered every year.

They come in a wide range of sizes and colors. The majority are green or brown, which helps them camouflage with their surroundings. However, some species are brightly colored, patterned, or even luminescent.

Mantis has a “prayer position” where they bring their hands together in front of their chest. This is how they got their name, as it resembles someone praying. This position is used for two main reasons: to capture prey and to deter predators.

Identification

Mantis (mantises) are among the largest insects. Adults generally range from 2 to 5 inches (5–12 cm) long.  Some species, however, can reach up to 6 or 7 inches (15–17 cm). Females are typically larger than males and can be nearly twice their size.

Mantis can be difficult to identify due to their wide range of colors and patterns. However, there are a few key characteristics that can help with identification.

  • One of the most distinctive features of mantis is their long, narrow thorax. This gives them a wasp-like appearance.
  • Another key characteristic is their large compound eyes. These eyes sit on top of a small “head” that can swivel from side to side.
  • The front legs of Mantis are raptorial, meaning they are adapted for grasping prey. These legs are usually much longer than the back legs and are often held in a “prayer position” when the mantis is resting.
  • The abdomen of a mantis is long and narrow, with 10 visible segments. The final segment is elongated and tapered, forming a sting-like ovipositor. Females use this ovipositor to lay eggs.

Mantid Species

Mantis are generally easy to recognize, but it requires more practice to tell them apart.

Carolina Mantis

This native Carolina mantis belongs to North America, where it can be found in a variety of climates, ranging from warm and tropical to cold and mountainous. This insect is characterized by its long front legs, which are tipped with specialized structures called tarsi. The Carolina mantis is also known for its aggressive hunting behavior, particularly when it comes to smaller insects like flies and grasshoppers.

Facts about Carolina Mantis:

  • The Carolina mantis is the state insect of South Carolina.
  • This species can grow to be over 2 inches (5 cm) long.
  • The Carolina mantis has excellent camouflage capabilities and can change its color to match its surroundings.

Chinese Mantis

The Chinese mantis is another common example of a mantid species. Like the Carolina mantis, this insect typically inhabits warmer climates such as forests and mountainsides. One key difference is that the Chinese mantis typically eats much larger prey than the Carolina mantis does – including crickets, cockroaches, small birds, lizards, and sometimes even small bats.

These insects have well-developed vision organs which help them to better spot their prey in densely vegetated areas where they like to hunt.

European Mantis Or Praying Mantis 

Lastly, there is the European or praying mantis. This species can be found across much of Europe as well as parts of Asia and Africa. As its name suggests, the European or praying mantis mimics a specific stance or posture when resting – with its forearms folded together in front of its face while held at an angle just below its head level.

This type of mantid typically preys on insects such as grasshoppers and flies but will occasionally capture young birds or lizards too. While each mantid species has unique characteristics that set it apart from others, they all share some important similarities – including impressively powerful mandibles that they use for catching prey and cutting into hard exoskeletons!

Different Types of Praying Mantis

Following are the different types of praying mantises discussed below:

Orchid Mantis

The orchid mantis is a beautiful pink and white flower-like species that is found in Southeast Asia. These mantises are often found near orchids, which they use for camouflage while waiting to ambush prey. Orchid mantises are about 3 inches (7.5 cm) long and have skinny legs.

African Mantis 

The African mantis is a large and colorful species that is found throughout Africa. These mantises can grow to be up to 6 inches (15 cm) long and come in a variety of colors, including green, brown, and pink. African mantises are skilled hunters that use their camouflage to blend in with leaves and branches while waiting for prey.

Spiny Flower Mantis

The spiny flower mantis is a small species that is found in Southeast Asia. These mantises are often found near flowers, which they use for camouflage while waiting to ambush prey. Spiny flower mantises typically grow to be about 1 inch (2.5 cm) long and have skinny legs.

Ghost Mantis

The ghost mantis is a pale-colored species that is found in Africa. These mantises are often found near bushes and trees, where they use their camouflage to blend in with the leaves and branches while waiting for prey. Ghost mantises are about 2 inches (5 cm) long and have very thin legs.

Giant Shield Mantis

The giant shield mantis is a large species that is found in Africa. These mantises can grow to be over 6 inches (15 cm) long and are often brightly colored. Giant shield mantises are skilled hunters that use their camouflage to blend in with leaves and branches while waiting for prey.

Mantis are a group of insects that

Dead Leaf Mantis

The dead leaf mantis is a small species that is found in Southeast Asia. These mantises are often found near dead leaves, which they use for camouflage while waiting to ambush prey. Dead leaf mantises typically grow to be about 1 inch (2.5 cm) long and have thin legs.

Arizona Unicorn Mantis

The Arizona unicorn mantis is a large and colorful species that is found in the deserts of Arizona. These mantises can grow over 5 inches (12.5 cm) long and are often brightly colored. Arizona unicorn mantises are skilled hunters that use their camouflage to blend in with leaves and branches while waiting for prey.

Devil’s Flower Mantis

The devil’s flower mantis is a large and colorful species that is found in Africa. These mantises can grow over 6 inches (15 cm) long and are often brightly colored. Devil’s flower mantises are skilled hunters that use their camouflage to blend in with leaves and branches while waiting for prey.

Conehead Mantis

The conehead mantis is a small species that is found in tropical areas of Africa and Asia. These mantises are often found near bushes and trees, where they use their camouflage to blend in with the leaves and branches while waiting for prey. Conehead mantises typically grow to be about 1 inch (2.5 cm) long and have skinny legs.

Habitat And Conservation 

Millions of mantises live around the world in a wide range of habitats, from tropical forests to grasslands and temperate woodlands. These different environments provide a variety of different conditions, from sudden changes in temperature and humidity to fluctuations in the availability of food sources. Despite this diversity, mantises are well-adapted to survive and thrive in these conditions.

One important factor in the success of mantises is their ability to adapt their shelter. Mantises typically build their protective webs or dwellings on tree branches or between leaves, but they can also be found living under rocks or fallen logs when necessary. Additionally, many species of mantis remain active throughout the year and adjust their activity levels based on the availability of prey. This allows them to efficiently consume food and carve out their territory while avoiding competition with other insects for prey.

Cycle Of Life

Mantis typically only have one year of life. The rest of the growing season is spent by them feeding, growing, and molting after they hatch in the spring.  Once they reach adulthood, Mantis mate. After mating, the female typically lays her eggs in a foam-like material that she produces. This material hardens and shields the eggs through winter. In the season of spring, the eggs hatch and the cycle begins anew.

Human Interactions

Although it is alluring to categorize all insect-eating animals as “helpful simply,” making absolute determinations about Mantis’ worth to humans presents difficulties. In addition to eating numerous beneficial insects, such as other insect predators, pollinators, butterflies, and so forth, Mantis also consume a variety of harmful insects.

In agricultural systems, Mantis can be extremely beneficial in controlling insect pests; in natural systems, their role is more complex.

Mantis have been used in pest control for centuries. The Chinese have used Mantis to control crop pests for at least 1,000 years, and the practice spread to other countries, including the United States, in the 1800s.

In the United States, Mantis are not commonly used in agriculture because they are not very specific in their diet and will also consume beneficial insects. However, they are sometimes released in gardens and greenhouses to control pests such as aphids, whiteflies, leafhoppers, and small caterpillars.

Ecosystem Connections

Mantises have important connections within many different ecosystems.

Plant Connection

One important ecosystem connection for mantises is with plants. Mantis nymphs eat small insects that harm crops and other plants, helping to keep plants healthy and productive. Additionally, some plant species actually reproduce more successfully if mantises are present in their surroundings since the predatory insects can help control pests like aphids, which feed on plant sap.

Animal Connection

Another important ecosystem connection for mantises is to other animals. Mantises prey on large insects and small animals such as birds and lizards, thus maintaining balance in these ecosystems by keeping populations of harmful or unwanted critters low.

Furthermore, local bird species often adopt nest-building behaviors to avoid falling prey to formidable mantis predators. For example, they may choose more well-hidden nests or build them in locations with better defenses against attacks from above.

Overall, this diverse group serves as an essential part of many interconnected communities worldwide.

Final Thoughts

Of the 2,200 species of mantis in the world, only a small handful live in the United States. Most Mantis found in gardens and yards are European Manticinae introduced accidentally through horticultural shipments. If you have praying Mantis on your property, consider yourself lucky to have such an interesting beneficial insect around! These fascinating predators help keep garden pests under control. For more information about different types of praying mantis and professional pest removal services, visit Ortex pest control. You’ll get to know why hiring a professional is the best way to protect your surroundings from pests.

Our Locations

Clarksville, TN

Nashville, TN

Huntsville, AL

Locations

Find Your Local Office

Enter your zip code to find your local area office: